Posted on November 11, 2014
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More than 30 years ago, Adrian Haagensen set up a new company in Grimsby making bespoke furniture for both domestic and business use.

Since then, the company has grown from strength to strength while still retaining its core ideals of providing high quality furniture with a personal service.

However, the company realised that it had reached full production capacity, and that the obstacle to further growth was the machining capability of one of its current CNC machines used in the production of the carcasses of the furniture.

A successful application to the Humber Local Enterprise Partnership’s Regional Growth Fund (RGF) will enable the company to purchase a new CNC router which will be integrated into the existing production line. £37,500 grant will support the total project cost of £125,000.

Additionally, the company will employ two new members of staff in the next six months as a result of the grant.

Luke Haagensen, Operations Manager at the company, said, “Our ability to manufacture bespoke sizes rather than purchasing standard units is our strength. This investment will give us the opportunity to streamline operations and speed up production. We’re grateful for the grant – it means we can buy the machinery much earlier than we envisaged, and get on with doing what we do best. I’d also like to personally thank the team at e-factor for their expert help and guidance through the application process. We couldn’t have done it without them.”

Councillor Ray Oxby, portfolio holder for regeneration at North East Lincolnshire Council said, “We’re pleased to support small businesses through this grant programme. Sometimes small grants mean the world of difference to SMEs and that’s something we support where we can – whether it’s one job or a hundred, any intervention that helps provide jobs in our area is worth it. I would also like to thank Mark Webb’s E-factor and the Council’s Economic Development teams who have and continue to put in, enormous work and support that often goes unnoticed behind the scenes”